“Will a Rambunctious Writing Workshop be suitable for my unique needs and background?” people ask.  Absolutely! No Question! Guaranteed! No matter whether you’ve got a formal, spattered or non-existent writing background. When we forsake the learned, formulaic ways, the  RULES!–and are playful with our writing (or our lives!) we open the floodgates on the expression that’s right here within—bursting–sometimes literally dying–to flow out. This may be useful:

ORIGINS OF RAMBUNCTIOUS WRITING

Twenty years ago, in my late forties, I recognized that when I was with sparkly people, this sparkly, witty Barbara appeared. When left to myself, I was heavy. All this healing and spiritual stuff was SERIOUS work, hey? Together with my husband, we were REALLY GOOD at doing “Deep and Meaningful.” Deciding to crack the shell on my silliness, I enrolled in a comedy class at the University. We were 30 people rolling on the floor, streaming tears of laughter, gobsmacked at our own wittiness. Where did it come from? I came alive!

I initiated weekly spontaneity gatherings with other addicts. Anyone, even the door-to-door salesman, was invited to play with me. Unable to wait for playmates, I translated the word games into writing and played with myself! Soon, I noticed my writing changing. My life-long forte had been descriptions of real places, people, experiences that touched or moved me, and journaling—to process self-discovery. While these approaches had indeed been inspired and spontaneous, and brought forth spectacular books, they weren’t especially playful. Obviously, playing with simple spontaneity structures stimulated colourful, rhythmic, unplanned, imaginative, wildly surprising words and juxtapositions—all of which would have been totally unproduced-able in the “follow-the-dots” way of writing. Now, even if I’m writing something serious, I’ve cultivated within me the willingness to be surprised by and accept what shows up. My bliss is midwifing workshop participants and coaching partners into birthing their profound, playful “Power Of Now” in writing.

This quote from Ralph Waldo Emerson says it all:
Men grind and grind in the mill of tradition and nothing comes out but what was put in, but the moment they desert the tradition for a spontaneous thought then poetry, wit, hope, virtue, learning, anecdote all flock to their aid.

There are several key components to developing the art of “forsaking tradition” which, of course, participants will receive in the next workshop Saturday, 19 November.

Barbara Brewster
Rambunctious Writing: Coaching • Courses • Workshops
Buderim, Queensland / The World / +61 (0)41 751 6680
Email: barbara@barbarabrewster.com  / www.barbarabrewster.com